about visual story

Visual Storytelling

I use visual storytelling as a way to convey a volume of information. At times this is done through either a single or series of still images, while at other times, I add animation, sound, music, voice overs, performance or other creative methods to assist the visual narrative to unfold.

In order to intensify and strengthen each visual narrative, I add extra items (found or made objects) to the work as my way of deepening the overall story. This becomes important, especially when words are not enough to communicate concrete ideas. This is where sound, voice, music and other creative communicators enter the visual story. Below I am providing 2 examples of the same subject matter to illustrate the ways in which I am putting this idea into practice.

The Gateway

In this still image, The Gateway, two women flank the left and right of the photograph. Their mirror-reversal form a headless birdlike figure, the gatekeeper, within the negative space. One hand holds a single branch, while the other holds an empty bird cage.

005_Lemeh_The_Gateway

Dorotha Lemeh, The Gateway, photograph on fine art paper, 2016

Q: When you consider particular myths, mythologies, and/or spiritual beliefs that you hold dear, how do you believe these stories influence what you see? How do you interpret your own understanding of this work?

The Gateway animated

While I am all for the stand alone work of art, there are times when I enjoy an additional layer of creative communication to be integrated to help interpret the visual story. This time adding animated movement brings the desired result. While the still of The Gateway functions as a stand a lone image, the animated version deepened the visual narrative in such a way that it offered other ways to perceive the story.

Dorotha Lemeh, The Gateway, animated, varies, 2016

As a visual artist, I really don’t want to tell people how to feel or what to think. I much prefer that viewers meet and interpret my artworks in a space where they feel most comfortable.

© Dorotha Grace Lemeh

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